White papers

  • Synchronizing camera timestamps without IEEE 1588
    Synchronizing camera timestamps without IEEE 1588

    Camera timestamps are a recommended GigE Vision/GenICam/SFNC feature to add the information when an image was taken (exactly: when the exposure of the image started). Without additional synchronization it is merely a camera individual timer with a vendor specific increment and implementation dependent accuracy. Each camera starts its own timestamp beginning with zero and there are no means to adjust or synchronize them among cameras or host PCs. There is effort ongoing to widely establish the precision timestamp according to IEEE 1588 into GigE Vision cameras. This involves cameras which are able to perform the required synchronization as well as specific network hardware and driver software and procedures to do and maintain the synchronization. There are many applications which do not or cannot profit from 1588 but have certain synchronization needs. The following article describes solutions for these scenarios.

    2016 Synchronizing camera timestamps without IEEE 1588

  • Motorized lenses with mvBlueCOUGAR-XD
    Motorized lenses with mvBlueCOUGAR-XD

    Whereas machine vision applications usually use constant lighting, there has been a trend to use GigE Vision cameras due to long cable length also in outdoor applications such as traffic monitoring, security, or sports. This enforces the need for controlling the image brightness by means of automatic gain or auto exposure on the one hand but also have possibilities to adjust field of view or zoom, or focus, or iris.

    2014 Motorized lenses with mvBlueCOUGAR-XD

  • Correction of sensor image errors
    Correction of sensor image errors

    Due to random process deviations, not all pixels in an image sensor array will react in the same way to a given light condition. These variations are known as blemishes or defective pixels.

    2014 Correction of sensor image errors

  • Color correction
    Color correction

    Many application fields like digital printing industry or the human medicine require a natural display of colors. To illustrate the importance of color fidelity, you can think about a doctor using an endoscope during an operation who wants to remove the right tissue. The purpose of this white paper is to show how you can optimize the color fidelity of a camera, so that it looks as natural as possible on different displays and for human vision.

    2013 Color correction

  • USB3 Vision, GigE Vision, GenICam - industrial image processing standards
    USB3 Vision, GigE Vision, GenICam - industrial image processing standards

    In the industrial image processing, there are more and more standards for consumer interfaces like Ethernet and USB, for example, GenICam, GigE Vision, and USB3 Vision. It is easy to get lost. But what’s the meaning of the standards and what are the benefits? The following article shows, which standards MATRIX VISION supports and how you can benefit from MATRX VISION cameras and from our knowhow concerning standards.

    2013 Industrial image processing standards

  • Specifics using CMOS sensors with rolling shutter
    Specifics using CMOS sensors with rolling shutter

    Many CMOS sensors only offer a rolling shutter. There are pros and cons concerning the issue rolling shutter which you have to keep in mind. This white paper will examine this topic.

    2008 Specifics using CMOS sensors with rolling shutter